• Corpus ID: 83243527

Adaptation and Natural Selection in Caves: The Evolution of Gammarus minus

@inproceedings{Culver1995AdaptationAN,
  title={Adaptation and Natural Selection in Caves: The Evolution of Gammarus minus},
  author={David C. Culver and Thomas C. Kane and Daniel W. Fong},
  year={1995}
}
1. Introduction 2. Caves as Evolutionary Laboratories 3. Gammarus minus as a Model Organism 4. The Ecological Theater 5. The Geography of Gammarus minus 6. Making a Case for Selection 7. Putting the Pieces Together 8. Questions of Time 9. Adaptation in Gammarus minus Glossary References Index 
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Phylogeographic studies have provided an unprecedented insight into the evolution of these unique fauna, and the future of the field should be inspiring and data rich.
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