Adaptation: Statistics and a Null Model for Estimating Phylogenetic Effects

@article{Gittleman1990AdaptationSA,
  title={Adaptation: Statistics and a Null Model for Estimating Phylogenetic Effects},
  author={John L. Gittleman and Mark Kot},
  journal={Systematic Biology},
  year={1990},
  volume={39},
  pages={227-241}
}
-Tests of adaptive explanations are often critically confounded by phylogenetic heritage. In this paper we propose statistics and a null model for estimating phylogenetic effects in comparative data. We apply a model-independent measure of autocorrelation (Moran's I) for estimating whether cross-taxonomic trait variation is related to phylogeny. We develop a phylogenetic correlogram for assessing how autocorrelation varies with patristic distance and for judging the appropriateness and… Expand
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