Acute macular neuroretinopathy: the evolution of the disease through the use of newer diagnostic modalities.

Abstract

Acute macular neuroretinopathy (AMNR) is a rare condition that occurs most often in healthy, young women. Acute macular neuroretinopathy may present as an asymptomatic condition but is typically associated with transient, variable visual disturbances, such as scotomata, metamorphopsia and mild decrease in vision. Symptoms differ in frequency and persistence. The condition was first described in 1975 by Bos and Deutman, who believed that the distinct retinal lesions seen in acute macular neuroretinopathy involve the inner retina and the superficial retinal layers. Ophthalmoscopically, these patients present with lobular, reddish brown, wedge-shaped lesions in the parafoveal area. Resolution of the lesions is common; however, the lesions may persist years later. The pathophysiology is uncertain and there is no proven treatment for the condition.

DOI: 10.1111/cxo.12161

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Cite this paper

@article{Rodman2014AcuteMN, title={Acute macular neuroretinopathy: the evolution of the disease through the use of newer diagnostic modalities.}, author={J. A. Rodman and Diana L. Shechtman and Kandace Haines}, journal={Clinical & experimental optometry}, year={2014}, volume={97 5}, pages={463-7} }