Acute lung injury in critical neurological illness*

@article{Hoesch2012AcuteLI,
  title={Acute lung injury in critical neurological illness*},
  author={Robert E. Hoesch and E M Lin and Mark Young and Rebecca F. Gottesman and Laith R. Altaweel and Paul A. Nyquist and Robert D. Stevens},
  journal={Critical Care Medicine},
  year={2012},
  volume={40},
  pages={587–593}
}
Objective: Acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome have been reported in a significant proportion of patients with critical neurologic illness. Our aim was to identify risk factors for acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome in this population. Design: Prospective, observational study. Setting: A 22-bed, adult neurosciences critical care unit at a tertiary care hospital. Patients: Primary neurologic disorder, mechanical ventilation >48 hrs. Interventions: None… 
Acute lung injury: surprisingly common in the neurologic intensive care unit.
TLDR
The incidence and risk factors for ALI/ARDS in a cohort of systemically evaluated patients who were mechanically ventilated for 48 hrs in the neurologic ICU at a large, academic medical center are reported and the inclusion of consecutive eligible patients clearly enhances the potential generalizability of the findings.
Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome After Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage*
TLDR
Development of acute respiratory distress syndrome is common after intubation for intracerebral hemorrhage and modifiable risk factors, including high tidal volume ventilation, are associated with its development and in-patient mortality.
Brain and Lung: Lung Injury in Patients with Brain Injury
TLDR
This review focuses on the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of lung injuries in patients with neurocritical illness, and the various strategies of mechanical ventilation used to reduce lung injury.
Brain-lung crosstalk: Implications for neurocritical care patients.
TLDR
The epidemiology and pathophysiology of lung injuries in brain-injured patients, but also the impact of different modalities of mechanical ventilation on the brain in the context of acute brain injury is described.
Neurogenic Pulmonary Edema and Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in a Healthy Child With Febrile Status Epilepticus
TLDR
A case of a 14-month-old previously healthy child who presented with febrile status epilepticus, fulminant neurogenic pulmonary edema, and acute respiratory distress syndrome is reported.
Acute respiratory distress syndrome: rather a (vague) concept than a (clear) definition*.
TLDR
The prevalence of “ARDS” in a large cohort of patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage is reported, and a high tidal volume was found to be an independent risk factor for the development of ARDS, as well as for inhospital mortality.
Brain–lung interactions and mechanical ventilation in patients with isolated brain injury
TLDR
The present review aims to fill the gap by describing the pathophysiology of complications due to lung injuries in patients with a single ABI, and discusses the possible impact of MV in neurocritical care patients with normal lungs.
Evolution Over Time of Ventilatory Management and Outcome of Patients With Neurologic Disease*
TLDR
Several prognostic factors on mortality such as advanced age, the severity of the disease, organ dysfunctions, and the etiology of neurologic disease are found, including lung-protective ventilatory strategies implemented over years in neurologic patients with no effect on pulmonary complications or on survival.
Lung-protective ventilation and adjunctive strategies to manage respiratory failure: are they safe in the neurological patient?
TLDR
Research is needed to determine the safety, feasibility, and efficacy of LPV and adjunctive approaches for managing patients with concurrent brain injury and respiratory failure.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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