Acute hormonal and neuromuscular responses to hypertrophy, strength and power type resistance exercise

@article{McCaulley2008AcuteHA,
  title={Acute hormonal and neuromuscular responses to hypertrophy, strength and power type resistance exercise},
  author={Grant O. McCaulley and Jeffrey M. Mcbride and Prue Cormie and Matthew B. Hudson and James L. Nuzzo and John C. Quindry and N. Travis Triplett},
  journal={European Journal of Applied Physiology},
  year={2008},
  volume={105},
  pages={695-704}
}
The purpose of the current study was to determine the acute neuroendocrine response to hypertrophy (H), strength (S), and power (P) type resistance exercise (RE) equated for total volume. Ten male subjects completed three RE protocols and a rest day (R) using a randomized cross-over design. The protocols included (1) H: 4 sets of 10 repetitions in the squat at 75% of 1RM (90 s rest periods); (2) S: 11 sets of three repetitions at 90% of 1RM (5 min rest periods); and (3) P: 8 sets of 6… 

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