Acute esophageal variceal sclerotherapy. Results of a prospective randomized controlled trial.

@article{Larson1986AcuteEV,
  title={Acute esophageal variceal sclerotherapy. Results of a prospective randomized controlled trial.},
  author={A. W. Larson and H. Cohen and B. Zweiban and D. Chapman and M. Gourdji and J. Korula and J. Weiner},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={1986},
  volume={255 4},
  pages={
          497-500
        }
}
Within 48 hours of variceal hemorrhage, 82 patients were randomly assigned to conventional treatment including balloon tamponade or to conventional treatment supplemented by sclerotherapy. The prerandomization general clinical characteristics of the two groups were similar. Seventy-nine percent of patients were alcoholic and 57% were in Child's class C. In the sclerotherapy group of 44 patients, sclerotherapy was performed twice in 28 patients and thrice in 13 patients over the two weeks of… Expand
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