Acute effects and recovery time following concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study.

@article{McCrea2003AcuteEA,
  title={Acute effects and recovery time following concussion in collegiate football players: the NCAA Concussion Study.},
  author={Michael C. McCrea and Kevin M. Guskiewicz and Stephen W Marshall and William B. Barr and Christopher Randolph and Robert C. Cantu and James A. O{\~n}ate and Jingzhen Yang and James P. Kelly},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2003},
  volume={290 19},
  pages={
          2556-63
        }
}
CONTEXT Lack of empirical data on recovery time following sport-related concussion hampers clinical decision making about return to play after injury. OBJECTIVE To prospectively measure immediate effects and natural recovery course relating to symptoms, cognitive functioning, and postural stability following sport-related concussion. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Prospective cohort study of 1631 football players from 15 US colleges. All players underwent preseason baseline testing on… 

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