Acute chest syndrome: sickle cell disease

@article{Paul2011AcuteCS,
  title={Acute chest syndrome: sickle cell disease},
  author={Rabindra N Paul and Oswaldo L. Castro and Anita Aggarwal and Patricia Ann Oneal},
  journal={European Journal of Haematology},
  year={2011},
  volume={87}
}
Acute chest syndrome (ACS) is a common complication and reason for hospital admission in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). It is also the most common cause of death in this patient population. Most of the time, the trigger for ACS in an individual patient cannot be identified. However, although infection is the most common identifiable cause for ACS, other important triggers are vaso‐occlusive crisis (VOC) and asthma. This comprehensive review will focus on the pathogenesis, clinical… Expand
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