Acute cerebral phycomycosis (mucormycosis). Report of a pediatric patient successfully treated with amphotericin B and cycloheximide and review of the pertinent literature.

@article{Landau1962AcuteCP,
  title={Acute cerebral phycomycosis (mucormycosis). Report of a pediatric patient successfully treated with amphotericin B and cycloheximide and review of the pertinent literature.},
  author={J. Landau and V. Newcomer},
  journal={The Journal of pediatrics},
  year={1962},
  volume={61},
  pages={
          363-85
        }
}
The incidence of infections caused by fungi of the class Phycomycetes has increased significantly in recent years. Grave impairment of the patient's immunologic resistance appears to be an essential predisposing factor for the development of this group of diseases; diabetes mellitus and leukemia are the 2 predisposing factors most frequently encountered in the United States. A classical example of acute cerebral phycomycosis in a 15-year-old girl who was debilitated by diabetic acidosis is… Expand
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