Acute Toxic Effects of Club Drugs

@article{Gable2004AcuteTE,
  title={Acute Toxic Effects of Club Drugs},
  author={Robert S. Gable},
  journal={Journal of Psychoactive Drugs},
  year={2004},
  volume={36},
  pages={303 - 313}
}
  • R. Gable
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine
  • Journal of Psychoactive Drugs
Abstract This article summarizes the short-term physiological toxicity and the adverse behavioral effects of four substances (GHB, ketamine, MDMA, and Rohypnol®) that have been used at late-night dance clubs. The two primary data sources were case studies of human fatalities and experimental studies with laboratory animals. A safety ratio was calculated for each substance based on its estimated lethal dose and its customary recreational dose. GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate) appears to be the most… Expand
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