Acute Threat to the Social Self: Shame, Social Self-esteem, and Cortisol Activity

@article{Gruenewald2004AcuteTT,
  title={Acute Threat to the Social Self: Shame, Social Self-esteem, and Cortisol Activity},
  author={Tara L. Gruenewald and Margaret E. Kemeny and Najib Aziz and John L. Fahey},
  journal={Psychosomatic Medicine},
  year={2004},
  volume={66},
  pages={915-924}
}
Objective: Our Social Self Preservation Theory asserts that situations which threaten the “social self” (ie, one’s social value or standing) elicit increased feelings of low social worth (eg, shame), decrements in social self-esteem, and increases in cortisol, a hormone released by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To test our theoretical premise, cognitive, emotional, and physiological responses to the performance of laboratory stressor tasks were compared in participants who performed… Expand
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