Acute Exposure to Altitude

@article{Hodkinson2011AcuteET,
  title={Acute Exposure to Altitude},
  author={Peter David Hodkinson},
  journal={Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps},
  year={2011},
  volume={157},
  pages={85 - 91}
}
  • P. Hodkinson
  • Published 1 March 2011
  • Environmental Science
  • Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps
Acute exposure to altitude principally encompasses aviation and space activities. These environments can be associated with very acute changes in pressure, oxygenation and temperature due to rates and magnitude of ascent that are not experienced in more chronic exposure such as mountaineering. The four key physiological challenges during acute exposure to altitude are: hypoxia (and hyperventilation), gas volume changes, decompression sickness and cold. The brief nature of aviation exposure to… 

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