Acute Effects of Antagonist Stretching on Jump Height, Torque, and Electromyography of Agonist Musculature

@article{Sandberg2012AcuteEO,
  title={Acute Effects of Antagonist Stretching on Jump Height, Torque, and Electromyography of Agonist Musculature},
  author={John B. Sandberg and Dale R Wagner and Jeffrey M. Willardson and Gerald A. Smith},
  journal={Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research},
  year={2012},
  volume={26},
  pages={1249–1256}
}
Abstract Sandberg, JB, Wagner, DR, Willardson, JM, and Smith, GA. Acute effects of antagonist stretching on jump height, torque, and electromyography of agonist musculature. J Strength Cond Res 26(5): 1249–1256, 2012—Although there has been substantial research on the acute effects of static stretching on subsequent force and power development, the outcome after stretching of the antagonist musculature has not been examined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of static… 

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