Actual causes of death in the United States, 2000.

@article{Mokdad2004ActualCO,
  title={Actual causes of death in the United States, 2000.},
  author={Ali H. Mokdad and James S. Marks and Donna F. Stroup and Julie Louise Gerberding},
  journal={JAMA},
  year={2004},
  volume={291 10},
  pages={
          1238-45
        }
}
CONTEXT Modifiable behavioral risk factors are leading causes of mortality in the United States. [] Key MethodDESIGN Comprehensive MEDLINE search of English-language articles that identified epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory studies linking risk behaviors and mortality. The search was initially restricted to articles published during or after 1990, but we later included relevant articles published in 1980 to December 31, 2002. Prevalence and relative risk were identified during the literature search…

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