Acts of Social Perspective Taking: A Functional Construct and the Validation of a Performance Measure for Early Adolescents

@article{Diazgranados2016ActsOS,
  title={Acts of Social Perspective Taking: A Functional Construct and the Validation of a Performance Measure for Early Adolescents},
  author={Silvia Diazgranados and Robert Louis Selman and Michelle Dionne},
  journal={Social Development},
  year={2016},
  volume={25},
  pages={572-601}
}
To understand and assess how early adolescents use their social perspective taking (SPT) skills in their consideration of social problems, we conducted two studies. In study 1, we administered a hypothetical SPT scenario to 359 fourth to eighth graders. Modeled on the linguistic pragmatics of speech acts, we used grounded theory to develop a functional approach that identified three types of SPT acts: (1) the acknowledgment of different actors, (2) the articulation of their thoughts and… 

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