Activity in medial prefrontal cortex during cognitive evaluation of threatening stimuli as a function of personality style

@article{Rubino2007ActivityIM,
  title={Activity in medial prefrontal cortex during cognitive evaluation of threatening stimuli as a function of personality style},
  author={Valeria Rubino and Giuseppe Blasi and Valeria Latorre and Leonardo Fazio and Immacolata d’Errico and Viridiana Mazzola and Grazia Caforio and Marcello Nardini and Teresa Popolizio and Ahmad R. Hariri and Giampiero Arciero and Alessandro Bertolino},
  journal={Brain Research Bulletin},
  year={2007},
  volume={74},
  pages={250-257}
}

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