Activity Pacing in Chronic Pain: Concepts, Evidence, and Future Directions

@article{Nielson2013ActivityPI,
  title={Activity Pacing in Chronic Pain: Concepts, Evidence, and Future Directions},
  author={Warren R Nielson and Mark P. Jensen and Petra A. Karsdorp and Johan W. S. Vlaeyen},
  journal={The Clinical Journal of Pain},
  year={2013},
  volume={29},
  pages={461–468}
}
Background:Activity pacing (AP) is a concept that is central to many chronic pain theories and treatments, yet there remains confusion regarding its definition and effects. Objective:To review the current knowledge concerning AP and integrate this knowledge in a manner that allows for a clear definition and useful directions for future research. Methods:A narrative review of the major theoretical approaches to AP and of the empirical evidence regarding the effects of AP interventions, followed… 

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