Activity/Stability of Human Pepsin: Implications for Reflux Attributed Laryngeal Disease

@article{Johnston2007ActivityStabilityOH,
  title={Activity/Stability of Human Pepsin: Implications for Reflux Attributed Laryngeal Disease},
  author={Nikki Johnston and Peter William Dettmar and Bimjhana Bishwokarma and Mark O. Lively and James A. Koufman},
  journal={The Laryngoscope},
  year={2007},
  volume={117}
}
Objectives/Hypothesis: Exposure of laryngeal epithelia to pepsin during extra‐esophageal reflux causes depletion of laryngeal protective proteins, carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme III (CAIII), and squamous epithelial stress protein Sep70. The first objective of this study was to determine whether pepsin has to be enzymatically active to deplete these proteins. The second objective was to investigate the effect of pH on the activity and stability of human pepsin 3b under conditions that might be… 
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Biomarkers and laryngopharyngeal reflux
Abstract Laryngopharyngeal reflux is a controversial but increasingly made diagnosis used in patients with a collection of often non-specific laryngeal symptoms. It is a clinical diagnosis, and its
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References

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TLDR
The objective was to investigate the potential use of pepsin and carbonic anhydrase isoenzyme III (CA‐III) as diagnostic markers for laryngopharyngeal reflux disease.
Effect of Pepsin on Laryngeal Stress Protein (Sep70, Sep53, and Hsp70) Response: Role in Laryngopharyngeal Reflux Disease
TLDR
The findings suggest that receptor-mediated uptake of pepsin by laryngeal epithelial cells, as may occur in LPR, causes a change in the normal acid-mediated stress protein response, which may lead to cellular injury and thus play a role in the development of disease.
Cell Biology of Laryngeal Epithelial Defenses in Health and Disease: Preliminary Studies
TLDR
The laryngeal epithelium expresses some CA isoenzymes and has the potential to protect itself against laryngopharyngeAL reflux and may be more sensitive to injury due to reflux damage than the esophageal mucosa because of different responses of CA isenzymes.
The Otolaryngologic Manifestations of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD): A Clinical Investigation of 225 Patients Using Ambulatory 24‐Hour pH Monitoring and an Experimental Investigation of the Role of Acid and Pepsin in the Development of Laryngeal Injury
TLDR
A new diagnostic technique is applied to a population of otolaryngology patients with GERD to determine the incidence of overt and occult GERD and the potential damaging effects of intermittent GER on the larynx are evaluated.
Cell Biology of Laryngeal Epithelial Defenses in Health and Disease: Further Studies
TLDR
The laryngeal epithelium lacks defenses comparable to those in esophageal epithellium, and these differences may contribute to the increased susceptibility of laryngesis to reflux-related injury.
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TLDR
The present study was undertaken of the effect ofpH on the stability and activity of pepsin.
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TLDR
To evaluate the overall strength of the association of GERD with laryngeal cancer, meta‐analysis of the original studies in literature was performed.
The human oesophageal squamous epithelium exhibits a novel type of heat shock protein response.
TLDR
Results indicate that human oesophageal squamous epithelium exhibits an atypical heat shock protein response, presumably due to the evolutionary adaptation of cells within this organ to survive in an unusual microenvironment exposed to chemical, thermal and acid reflux stresses.
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TLDR
This procedure for quantifying individual human pepsins and gastricsin in gastric juice is simple and reliable and may be of considerable importance in determining the mechanisms involved in the control and secretion of these digestive enzymes in man, including the effect of anti-ulcer drugs and the understanding of the pathophysiology of peptic ulcer disease.
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