Active versus passive cleft-type speech characteristics.

@article{Harding1998ActiveVP,
  title={Active versus passive cleft-type speech characteristics.},
  author={Anne Helen Harding and P Grunwell},
  journal={International journal of language & communication disorders},
  year={1998},
  volume={33 3},
  pages={329-52}
}
Cleft palate speech is generally described in terms of nasal resonance, nasal emission and compensatory articulations. A longitudinal study of children at different stages of surgical treatment revealed a distinction between passive and active cleft-type speech characteristics whereby passive characteristics were thought to be the product of structural abnormality or dysfunction and active characteristics were specific articulatory gestures replacing intended consonants. Passive and active… CONTINUE READING

From This Paper

Topics from this paper.

Citations

Publications citing this paper.
Showing 1-10 of 24 extracted citations

A cross-sectional cohort study of speech in five-year-olds with cleft palate ± lip to support development of national audit standards: benchmarking speech standards in the United Kingdom.

The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association • 2014
View 5 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Australian children with cleft palate achieve age-appropriate speech by 5 years of age.

International journal of pediatric otorhinolaryngology • 2017
View 13 Excerpts
Highly Influenced

Production of two Nasal Sounds by Speakers with Cleft Palate.

The Cleft palate-craniofacial journal : official publication of the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association • 2018
View 1 Excerpt

Similar Papers

Loading similar papers…