Active thrusting offshore Mount Lebanon: Source of the tsunamigenic A.D. 551 Beirut-Tripoli earthquake

@article{Elias2007ActiveTO,
  title={Active thrusting offshore Mount Lebanon: Source of the tsunamigenic A.D. 551 Beirut-Tripoli earthquake},
  author={Ata Richard Elias and Paul E Tapponnier and Satish C. Singh and Geoffrey C. P. King and A. Briais and Mathieu Da{\"e}ron and H{\'e}l{\`e}ne Carton and Alexander Sursock and Eric Jacques and Rachid Jomaa and Yann Klinger},
  journal={Geology},
  year={2007},
  volume={35},
  pages={755-758}
}
On 9 July A.D. 551, a large earthquake, followed by a tsunami, destroyed most of the coastal cities of Phoenicia (modern-day Lebanon). Tripoli is reported to have “drowned,” and Berytus (Beirut) did not recover for nearly 1300 yr afterwards. Geophysical data from the Shalimar survey unveil the source of this event, which may have had a moment magnitude (Mw) of 7.5 and was arguably one of the most devastating historical submarine earthquakes in the eastern Mediterranean: rupture of the offshore… Expand

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