Activation of the amygdala and anterior cingulate during nonconscious processing of sad versus happy faces

@article{Killgore2004ActivationOT,
  title={Activation of the amygdala and anterior cingulate during nonconscious processing of sad versus happy faces},
  author={William D. S. Killgore and Deborah A. Yurgelun-Todd},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2004},
  volume={21},
  pages={1215-1223}
}
Previous functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that the amygdala activates in response to fearful faces presented below the threshold of conscious visual perception. Using a backward masking procedure similar to that of previous studies, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to study the amygdala and anterior cingulate gyrus during preattentive presentations of sad and happy facial affect. Twelve healthy adult females underwent blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) fMRI… Expand
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