Activation of reward circuitry in human opiate addicts

@article{Sell1999ActivationOR,
  title={Activation of reward circuitry in human opiate addicts},
  author={L A Sell and J. S. Morris and Jenny Bearn and R. S. J. Frackowiak and Karl J. Friston and Raymond J. Dolan},
  journal={European Journal of Neuroscience},
  year={1999},
  volume={11}
}
The neurobiological mechanisms of opiate addictive behaviour in humans are unknown. A proposed model of addiction implicates ascending brainstem neuromodulatory systems, particularly dopamine. Using functional neuroimaging, we assessed the neural response to heroin and heroin‐related cues in established opiate addicts. We show that the effect of both heroin and heroin‐related visual cues are maximally expressed in the sites of origin of ascending midbrain neuromodulatory systems. These context… 
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