Activation of Brain Acetylcholine Receptors by Neuromuscular Blocking Drugs: A Possible Mechanism of Neurotoxicity

@article{Cardone1994ActivationOB,
  title={Activation of Brain Acetylcholine Receptors by Neuromuscular Blocking Drugs: A Possible Mechanism of Neurotoxicity},
  author={Claudia Cardone and Janos Szenohradszky and Spencer C. Yost and Philip E. Bickler},
  journal={Anesthesiology},
  year={1994},
  volume={80},
  pages={1155–1161}
}
Background:Neuromuscular blocking drugs cause excitement and seizures when introduced Into the central nervous system. We examined the possibility that these drugs produce paradoxical activation of acetylcholine or glutamate receptors, the chief types of brain receptors involved in excitatory neurotransmission. Methods:Because activation of central glutamate or acetylcholine receptors causes calcium influx into postsynaptic neurons, we measured intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]1) as… Expand
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