Action and object naming in frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration.

@article{Cotelli2006ActionAO,
  title={Action and object naming in frontotemporal dementia, progressive supranuclear palsy, and corticobasal degeneration.},
  author={Maria Cotelli and Barbara Borroni and Rosa Manenti and Antonella Alberici and Marco Calabria and Chiara Agosti and Anal{\`i}a Arevalo and Valeria Ginex and Paola Ortelli and Giuliano Binetti and Orazio Zanetti and Alessandro Padovani and Stefano F. Cappa},
  journal={Neuropsychology},
  year={2006},
  volume={20 5},
  pages={
          558-65
        }
}
Action naming has been reported to be disproportionately impaired in comparison to object naming in patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). This finding has been attributed to the crucial role of frontal cortex in action naming. The investigation of object and action naming in the different subtypes of FTD, as well as in the related conditions of progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD), may thus contribute to the elucidation of the cerebral correlates of… Expand
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