Acrylamide exposure and incidence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study

@article{ThonningOlesen2008AcrylamideEA,
  title={Acrylamide exposure and incidence of breast cancer among postmenopausal women in the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study},
  author={Pelle Thonning Olesen and Anja Olsen and Henrik Lund Frandsen and Kirsten Frederiksen and Kim Overvad and Anne Tj{\o}nneland},
  journal={International Journal of Cancer},
  year={2008},
  volume={122}
}
Acrylamide, a probable human carcinogen, is formed in several foods during high‐temperature processing. So far, epidemiological studies have not shown any association between human cancer risk and dietary exposure to acrylamide. The purpose of this study was to conduct a nested case control study within a prospective cohort study on the association between breast cancer and exposure to acrylamide using biomarkers. N‐terminal hemoglobin adduct levels of acrylamide and its genotoxic metabolite… Expand
Pre-diagnostic acrylamide exposure and survival after breast cancer among postmenopausal Danish women.
TLDR
It is indicated that pre-diagnostic exposure to acrylamide may be related to mortality among breast cancer patients and that this may especially concern the most endocrine related type of breast cancer. Expand
A Prospective Study on Dietary Acrylamide Intake and the Risk for Breast, Endometrial, and Ovarian Cancers
TLDR
No association between acrylamide intake and breast cancer overall or according to estrogen and progesterone receptor status is found and risk for endometrial cancer and possibly ovarian cancer was greater among high acrieslamide consumers. Expand
re-diagnostic acrylamide exposure and survival after breast cancer among ostmenopausal Danish women
Acrylamide is a probable human carcinogen, with industrial contact, tobacco smoking and foods processed at high temperatures as the main routes of exposure. In animal studies oral intake ofExpand
Lung cancer risk in relation to dietary acrylamide intake.
TLDR
Acrylamide intake was not associated with lung cancer risk in men but was inversely associated in women, most strongly for adenocarcinoma, which suggests that acrylamides is involved in human carcinogenesis through pathways other than genotoxicity. Expand
Dietary Acrylamide Intake and the Risk of Lymphatic Malignancies: The Netherlands Cohort Study on Diet and Cancer
TLDR
Signs are found that acrylamide may increase the risk of multiple myeloma and follicular lymphoma in men and more research into these observed associations is warranted. Expand
Acrylamide Hemoglobin Adduct Levels and Ovarian Cancer Risk: A Nested Case–Control Study
TLDR
The finding indicates that acrylamide intake may not increase risk of ovarian cancer, and the association did not differ by tumor histology (serous invasive versus not), P for heterogeneity = 0.86. Expand
Dietary acrylamide intake and estrogen and progesterone receptor-defined postmenopausal breast cancer risk
TLDR
This study showed some indications of a positive association between dietary acrylamide intake and receptor-positive breast cancer risk in postmenopausal never-smoking women. Expand
Dietary acrylamide intake and risk of premenopausal breast cancer.
TLDR
The authors found no associations between intakes of foods high in acrylamide, including French fries, coffee, cereal, potato chips, potatoes, and baked goods, and breast cancer risk. Expand
Long-term dietary acrylamide intake and breast cancer risk in a prospective cohort of Swedish women.
TLDR
Findings for Swedish women do not support the hypothesis that dietary acrylamide is positively associated with risk of breast cancer, at least not within the ranges of acylamide consumed by this population. Expand
Dietary acrylamide intake and risk of breast cancer in the UK women's cohort
TLDR
A weak association may exist with premenopausal breast cancer, but requires further investigation, and there is no evidence of an association between dietary acrylamide intake and breast cancer. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 63 REFERENCES
Prospective study of dietary acrylamide and risk of colorectal cancer among women
TLDR
No evidence that dietary intake of acrylamide is associated with cancers of the colon or rectum is found in this large prospective study using prospective data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Expand
Inconclusive results from an epidemiological study on dietary acrylamide and cancer
TLDR
The authors state: ‘The first study of dietary acrylamide in relation to three major human cancers is reassuring’, but it is not realistic that not even a ‘true’ relative risk as high as 2.4 could have been detected in the Swedish study. Expand
Dietary acrylamide and risk of renal cell cancer
TLDR
There is no association between dietary acrylamide intake through diet and risk of renal cell cancer, and data from a large population‐based Swedish case‐control study of kidney cell cancer is reanalyzed. Expand
Dietary acrylamide and human cancer
TLDR
This uniquely large and comprehensive data set does not show any consistent association between intake of acrylamide and the risk of breast and several other common cancers. Expand
Associations between estimated acrylamide intakes, and hemoglobin AA adducts in a sample from the Malmö Diet and Cancer cohort
TLDR
This study suggests that both diet and tobacco are important sources of the environmental AA exposure, although the lack of correlations in non-smoking women cast doubt on the validity of dietary AA intake estimates used in cancer epidemiology, or suggest that unrecognized factors may influence the internal dose measure of AA exposure. Expand
Dietary acrylamide and cancer of the large bowel, kidney, and bladder: Absence of an association in a population-based study in Sweden
TLDR
Reanalysed a population-based Swedish case–control study found reassuring evidence that dietary exposure to acrylamide in amounts typically ingested by Swedish adults in certain foods has no measurable impact on risk of three major types of cancer. Expand
Differences in hemoglobin adduct levels of acrylamide in the general population with respect to dietary intake, smoking habits and gender.
TLDR
The observed relatively narrow inter-individual variation in AA-adduct levels means that estimates of individual dietary AA intake have to be very precise if they should be useful in future cancer epidemiology. Expand
Comparison of estimated dietary intake of acrylamide with hemoglobin adducts of acrylamide and glycidamide.
TLDR
A significant positive correlation was found between the AA-Hb adduct concentration and the intake of chips/snacks and crisp bread and a method using solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography with negative electrospray tandem mass spectrometric (MS/MS) detection for the determination of the HbAdducts as phenylthiohydantoin derivatives in human blood was developed. Expand
Smoking cigarettes before first childbirth and risk of breast cancer.
TLDR
The findings from this study suggest that sensitivity of the female breast to tobacco carcinogens is increased during adolescence and early adulthood but decreases after first childbirth, when most breast tissue has terminally differentiated. Expand
Health effects of occupational exposure to acrylamide using hemoglobin adducts as biomarkers of internal dose.
TLDR
The use of Hb adducts of acrylamide as a biomarker of internal dose revealed strong dose-response associations between Hb-adduct levels and PNS symptoms and signs. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...