Across-Language Perspective on Speech Information Rate

@article{Pellegrino2011AcrossLanguagePO,
  title={Across-Language Perspective on Speech Information Rate},
  author={François Pellegrino and François Christophe Egidio Coup{\'e} and François Christophe Egidio Marsico},
  journal={Language},
  year={2011},
  volume={87},
  pages={539 - 558}
}
This article is a crosslinguistic investigation of the hypothesis that the average information rate conveyed during speech communication results from a trade-off between average information density and speech rate. The study, based on seven languages, shows a negative correlation between density and rate, indicating the existence of several encoding strategies. However, these strategies do not necessarily lead to a constant information rate. These results are further investigated in relation to… 
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