Acquired hearing loss and brain plasticity

@article{Eggermont2017AcquiredHL,
  title={Acquired hearing loss and brain plasticity},
  author={Jos J. Eggermont},
  journal={Hearing Research},
  year={2017},
  volume={343},
  pages={176-190}
}
  • J. Eggermont
  • Published 31 January 2017
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • Hearing Research
ABSTRACT Acquired hearing loss results in an imbalance of the cochlear output across frequency. Central auditory system homeostatic processes responding to this result in frequency specific gain changes consequent to the emerging imbalance between excitation and inhibition. Several consequences thereof are increased spontaneous firing rates, increased neural synchrony, and (in adults) potentially restricted to the auditory thalamus and cortex a reorganization of tonotopic areas. It does not… 
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