Acid base and electrolyte changes after hypertonic saline (7.5%) infusion: A randomized controlled clinical trial

@article{KlsenPetersen2005AcidBA,
  title={Acid base and electrolyte changes after hypertonic saline (7.5\%) infusion: A randomized controlled clinical trial},
  author={Jens Aage K{\o}lsen-Petersen and Jens O. Nielsen and Else T{\o}nnesen},
  journal={Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation},
  year={2005},
  volume={65},
  pages={13 - 22}
}
Hypertonic saline solutions are effective in the treatment of haemorrhagic and septic shock, elevated intracranial pressure and perioperative fluid deficits. Infusion, however, causes electrolyte and acid‐base imbalance. In a randomized double‐blind study, the effects of a 10‐min infusion of 4 ml/kg 7.5% NaCl or 0.9% NaCl were evaluated in 14 fasting women before hysterectomy. Venous blood from the forearm was collected at baseline, 10, 20, 30, 60 and 120 min after start of the infusion for the… 
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