Achieving a Predictable 24‐Hour Return to Normal Activities after Breast Augmentation: Part I. Refining Practices by Using Motion and Time Study Principles

@article{Tebbetts2002AchievingAP,
  title={Achieving a Predictable 24‐Hour Return to Normal Activities after Breast Augmentation: Part I. Refining Practices by Using Motion and Time Study Principles},
  author={John B. Tebbetts},
  journal={Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery},
  year={2002},
  volume={109},
  pages={273–290}
}
  • J. Tebbetts
  • Published 1 January 2002
  • Medicine
  • Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
&NA; The purpose of this study was to develop techniques to predictably return patients receiving inframammary and axillary, subpectoral breast augmentation to full normal activities within 24 hours of their primary breast augmentation. This 5‐year study applies motion and time study principles to refine practices in augmentation mammaplasty to reduce perioperative morbidity and shorten patient recovery. Retrospective data for operative times, medications administered, recovery times, times to… Expand
Achieving a predictable 24-hour return to normal activities after breast augmentation: Part II. Patient preparation, refined surgical techniques, and instrumentation.
TLDR
Applying motion and time study principles to analysis and refinement of instrumentation and surgical techniques resulted in a substantial reduction in perioperative morbidity and a simpler, shorter 24-hour return to full normal activity for 96 percent of the patients undergoing breast augmentation in group 3 compared with groups 1 and 2. Expand
Achieving a Predictable 24-Hour Return to Normal Activities after Breast Augmentation: Part II. Patient Preparation, Refined Surgical Techniques, and Instrumentation
  • J. Tebbetts
  • Medicine
  • Plastic and reconstructive surgery
  • 2002
TLDR
Applying motion and time study principles to analysis and refinement of instrumentation and surgical techniques resulted in a substantial reduction in perioperative morbidity and a simpler, shorter 24-hour return to full normal activity for 96 percent of the patients undergoing breast augmentation in group 3 compared with groups 1 and 2. Expand
Decreasing the Recovery Time from Breast Augmentation: Changing the Mind-Set of the Patient, the Technique of the Surgeon, and the Postoperative Care
TLDR
Early postoperative arm exercises and encouraged activity, coupled with dissection, led to an earlier return to normal activities in patients after breast augmentation recovery. Expand
Achieving quicker recovery after breast augmentation.
TLDR
The goal was to determine whether certain adopted practices would predictably return BA patients to full normal activities within 24 hours of surgery, thus sparing them a slow, painful recovery. Expand
Prospective Outcome Study of 225 Cases of Breast Augmentation
  • E. Swanson
  • Medicine
  • Plastic and reconstructive surgery
  • 2013
TLDR
Breast augmentation improves self-esteem and quality of life and persistent numbness is unusual, and almost all patients (98.7 percent) would repeat the surgery. Expand
A Process for Quantifying Aesthetic and Functional Breast Surgery: II. Applying Quantified Dimensions of the Skin Envelope to Design and Preoperative Planning for Mastopexy and Breast Reduction
  • J. Tebbetts
  • Medicine
  • Plastic and reconstructive surgery
  • 2014
TLDR
This study defines processes for using objectively defined parameters for skin envelope modification in mastopexy and breast reduction to enable surgeons to objectively quantify vertical skin excess and horizontal skin excess, select envelope modification design and techniques based on those parameters, and evaluate outcomes based on objective clinical measurements. Expand
Large area local anesthesia (LALA) in submuscular breast augmentation.
TLDR
A trend toward decreased nausea and vomiting and narcotic use, and a statistically significant decrease in time to discharge, for the cohort that received intraoperative bupivacaine irrigation is found. Expand
Dual-plane breast augmentation for minimal ptosis pseudoptosis (the "in-between" patient).
TLDR
The DPBA approach is most likely suited for patients with minimal ptosis who fall into a "gray area" between normal anatomy and frank ptosis and will allow surgeons to more effectively treat patients who present with unique "in-between" anatomy not addressed by ordinary BA and avoid more extensive mastopexy scars. Expand
Maximizing Outcomes in Breast Reduction Surgery: A Review of 518 Consecutive Patients
TLDR
An evolutionary approach to bilateral reduction mammaplasty with low complication rates and high patient satisfaction is presented, with optimization of technique leading to decreased operative times, shortened lengths of stay, and contributes to efficient use of surgeon and operating room resources. Expand
Breast Implant Procedures under Conscious Sedation: A 6-Year Experience in 461 Consecutive Patients
TLDR
Higher preoperative doses of diazepam have significantly reduced fentanyl requirements, resulting in shorter recovery times, decreased postoperative nausea/vomiting, and elimination of unintended admissions, the authors’ study demonstrates. Expand
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Achieving a Predictable 24-Hour Return to Normal Activities after Breast Augmentation: Part II. Patient Preparation, Refined Surgical Techniques, and Instrumentation
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Applying motion and time study principles to analysis and refinement of instrumentation and surgical techniques resulted in a substantial reduction in perioperative morbidity and a simpler, shorter 24-hour return to full normal activity for 96 percent of the patients undergoing breast augmentation in group 3 compared with groups 1 and 2. Expand
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