Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.

@article{James2003AcetaminopheninducedH,
  title={Acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity.},
  author={Laura P James and Philip R. Mayeux and Jack A. Hinson},
  journal={Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals},
  year={2003},
  volume={31 12},
  pages={
          1499-506
        }
}
  • L. James, P. Mayeux, J. Hinson
  • Published 1 December 2003
  • Biology, Medicine, Chemistry
  • Drug metabolism and disposition: the biological fate of chemicals
The analgesic acetaminophen causes a potentially fatal, hepatic centrilobular necrosis when taken in overdose. The initial phases of toxicity were described in Dr. Gillette's laboratory in the 1970s. These findings indicated that acetaminophen was metabolically activated by cytochrome P450 enzymes to a reactive metabolite that depleted glutathione (GSH) and covalently bound to protein. It was shown that repletion of GSH prevented the toxicity. This finding led to the development of the… 

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