Acetaminophen and diphenhydramine premedication for allergic and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions: good prophylaxis or bad practice?

@article{Geiger2007AcetaminophenAD,
  title={Acetaminophen and diphenhydramine premedication for allergic and febrile nonhemolytic transfusion reactions: good prophylaxis or bad practice?},
  author={Terrence L Geiger and Scott C. Howard},
  journal={Transfusion medicine reviews},
  year={2007},
  volume={21 1},
  pages={1-12}
}
Febrile nonhemolytic and allergic reactions are the most common transfusion reactions, but usually do not cause significant morbidity. In an attempt to prevent these reactions, US physicians prescribe acetaminophen or diphenhydramine premedication before more than 50% of blood component transfusions. Acetaminophen and diphenhydramine are effective therapies for fever and allergy, respectively, so their use in transfusion has some biologic rationale. However, these medications also have… CONTINUE READING

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