Accuracy, confidence, and juror perceptions in eyewitness identification.

@article{Wells1979AccuracyCA,
  title={Accuracy, confidence, and juror perceptions in eyewitness identification.},
  author={Gary L Wells and Rod C. L. Lindsay and Tamara J. Ferguson},
  journal={The Journal of applied psychology},
  year={1979},
  volume={64 4},
  pages={
          440-8
        }
}
Subjects of both sexes individually witnessed the staged theft of a calculator. The 127 witnesses were then given the opportunity to identify the thief from a six-person picture array; from this sample, 24 accurate-iden tification witnesses and 18 inaccurate-id entification witnesses were cross-examined with either leading or nonleading questions. Jurors were unable to distinguish accurate from inaccurate witnesses across the 42 cross-examina tion sessions (d' = .02). However, jurors in the… Expand
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