Accounting for sequential trial effects in the flanker task: Conflict adaptation or associative priming?

@article{Nieuwenhuis2006AccountingFS,
  title={Accounting for sequential trial effects in the flanker task: Conflict adaptation or associative priming?},
  author={S. Nieuwenhuis and J. Stins and D. Posthuma and T.J.C. Polderman and D. Boomsma and E. J. Geus},
  journal={Memory \& Cognition},
  year={2006},
  volume={34},
  pages={1260-1272}
}
The conflict-control loop theory proposes that the detection of conflict in information processing triggers an increase in cognitive control, resulting in improved performance on the subsequent trial. This theory seems consistent with the robust finding that conflict susceptibility is reduced following correct trials associated with high conflict: the conflict adaptation effect. However, despite providing favorable conditions for eliciting and detecting conflict-triggered performance… Expand
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