Accessibility and the Journey to Work

@article{Levinson1998AccessibilityAT,
  title={Accessibility and the Journey to Work},
  author={D. Levinson},
  journal={Journal of Transport Geography},
  year={1998},
  volume={6},
  pages={11-21}
}
  • D. Levinson
  • Published 1998
  • Economics
  • Journal of Transport Geography
  • This study analyzes the effect of accessibility to jobs and houses at both the home and work ends of trips on commuting duration for respondents to a household travel survey in metropolitan Washington, DC. A model is constructed to estimate the effects of demographics and relative location on the journey to work. Analysis finds that residences in job-rich areas and workplaces in housing-rich areas are associated with shorter commutes. An implication of this study is that, by balancing… CONTINUE READING
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