Access to mates in a territorial ungulate is determined by the size of a male's territory, but not by its habitat quality.

@article{Vanp2009AccessTM,
  title={Access to mates in a territorial ungulate is determined by the size of a male's territory, but not by its habitat quality.},
  author={C. Vanp{\'e} and N. Morellet and P. Kjellander and M. Goulard and O. Liberg and A. Hewison},
  journal={The Journal of animal ecology},
  year={2009},
  volume={78 1},
  pages={
          42-51
        }
}
1. Territoriality is commonly associated with resource defence polygyny, where males are expected to gain access to females by anticipating how resources will influence female distribution and competing for resource-rich sites to establish their zone of dominance. 2. We tested this hypothesis in European roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) by simultaneously assessing the influence of resources on female distribution and the influence of female distribution on male distribution and breeding success… Expand

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