Acceptance and commitment therapy-based self-management versus psychoeducation training for staff caring for clients with a personality disorder: a randomized controlled trial.

Abstract

People diagnosed with a personality disorder (PD) are often a stigmatized patient group. This can affect the care they receive, their progression, and the well-being of staff caring for them. Interventions targeted at health care professionals that aim to improve attitudes toward these patients and improve staff well-being do exist; however, evidence for their effectiveness is limited. The present study compared a self-management, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based training intervention (ACTr) with a Psychoeducation Training (PETr) intervention in their effectiveness in improving attitudes toward PD patients, staff-patient relations, and staff well-being. Both interventions were successful at improving attitudes and measures of staff-patient relations up to 6 months after training; however, staff well-being did not change for either group. The implications for staff training and future research are discussed.

DOI: 10.1521/pedi_2014_28_149

Cite this paper

@article{Clarke2015AcceptanceAC, title={Acceptance and commitment therapy-based self-management versus psychoeducation training for staff caring for clients with a personality disorder: a randomized controlled trial.}, author={Sue Clarke and Georgina Taylor and Joanna Lancaster and Bob Remington}, journal={Journal of personality disorders}, year={2015}, volume={29 2}, pages={163-76} }