AccelPrint: Imperfections of Accelerometers Make Smartphones Trackable

@inproceedings{Dey2014AccelPrintIO,
  title={AccelPrint: Imperfections of Accelerometers Make Smartphones Trackable},
  author={Sanorita Dey and Nirupam Roy and W. Xu and Romit Roy Choudhury and Srihari Nelakuditi},
  booktitle={NDSS},
  year={2014}
}
As mobile begins to overtake the fixed Internet access, ad networks have aggressively sought methods to track users on their mobile devices. While existing countermeasures and regulation focus on thwarting cookies and various device IDs, this paper submits a hypothesis that smartphone/tablet accelerometers possess unique fingerprints, which can be exploited for tracking users. We believe that the fingerprints arise from hardware imperfections during the sensor manufacturing process, causing… Expand
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