Academic inbreeding and research productivity and impact in Australian law schools

@article{Smyth2013AcademicIA,
  title={Academic inbreeding and research productivity and impact in Australian law schools},
  author={Russell Smyth and Vinod Mishra},
  journal={Scientometrics},
  year={2013},
  volume={98},
  pages={583-618}
}
This study compares the research productivity and impact of inbred and non-inbred faculty employed at Australian law schools. The sample consists of 429 academics, employed at 21 law schools. To measure research productivity and impact we use articles published in top law journals, defined in six different ways, as well as total citations and two different citation indices. We report results including, and excluding, publications in the academic’s home law review. We find evidence that silver… CONTINUE READING
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