Academic freedom and the paradox of tolerance

@article{Pearce2021AcademicFA,
  title={Academic freedom and the paradox of tolerance},
  author={Ruth Pearce},
  journal={Nature Human Behaviour},
  year={2021}
}
  • R. Pearce
  • Published 1 November 2021
  • Education
  • Nature Human Behaviour
2 Citations
POWES is pronounced “feminist”: Negotiating academic and activist boundaries in the talk of UK feminist psychologists
The Psychology of Women and Equalities Section (POWES) of the British Psychological Society (BPS) accounts for much of the feminist action in British psychology and beyond. In this qualitative study,
Rainbows should reign not only on LGBTQ+ STEM Day.
  • Education
    Nature human behaviour
  • 2021

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