Absolute hearing thresholds and critical masking ratios in the European barn owl: a comparison with other owls

@article{Dyson1998AbsoluteHT,
  title={Absolute hearing thresholds and critical masking ratios in the European barn owl: a comparison with other owls},
  author={M. L Dyson and Georg Martin Klump and B Gauger},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={1998},
  volume={182},
  pages={695-702}
}
Abstract Absolute thresholds and critical masking ratios were determined behaviorally for the European barn owl (Tyto alba guttata). It shows an excellent sensitivity throughout its hearing range with a minimum threshold of −14.2 dB sound pressure level at 6.3 kHz, which is similar to the sensitivity found in the American barn owl (Tyto alba pratincola) and some other owls. Both the European and the American barn owl have a high upper-frequency limit of hearing exceeding that in other bird… 
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