Abscisic acid concentration, root pH and anatomy do not explain growth differences of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) on acid and alkaline soils

@article{Hartung2004AbscisicAC,
  title={Abscisic acid concentration, root pH and anatomy do not explain growth differences of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and lupin (Lupinus angustifolius L.) on acid and alkaline soils},
  author={Wolfram Hartung and Laurent Leport and Robert Ratcliffe and Angela Sauter and Regina Duda and Neil C Turner},
  journal={Plant and Soil},
  year={2004},
  volume={240},
  pages={191-199}
}
The ABA concentrations of leaves, roots, soils and transport fluids of chickpea and lupin plants growing in acid (pH=4.8) and alkaline (pH=8.0) soils and an acid soil with an alkaline subsoil and an alkaline soil with an acid subsoil were measured with the aim of explaining the poor growth of narrow-leafed lupins in alkaline soil. The ABA concentration in the leaves was higher in lupin than chickpea, but did not differ when the plants were grown in alkaline compared to acid soil. The ABA… CONTINUE READING

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