Abrupt warming events drove Late Pleistocene Holarctic megafaunal turnover

@article{Cooper2015AbruptWE,
  title={Abrupt warming events drove Late Pleistocene Holarctic megafaunal turnover},
  author={Alan Cooper and Chris S. M. Turney and Konrad A Hughen and Barry W. Brook and H. Gregory McDonald and Corey J. A. Bradshaw},
  journal={Science},
  year={2015},
  volume={349},
  pages={602 - 606}
}
Climate killed off the megafauna The causes of the Pleistocene extinctions of large numbers of megafaunal species in the Northern Hemisphere remain unclear. A range of evidence points to human hunting, climate change, or a combination of both. Using ancient DNA and detailed paleoclimate data, Cooper et al. report a close relationship between Pleistocene megafaunal extinction events and rapid warming events at the start of interstadial periods. Their analysis strengthens the case for climate… Expand

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