Abortions in free ranging Hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus) — a male induced strategy?

@article{Agoramoorthy1988AbortionsIF,
  title={Abortions in free ranging Hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus) — a male induced strategy?},
  author={Govindasamy Agoramoorthy and S. M. Mohnot and Volker Sommer and A. K. Srivastava},
  journal={Human Evolution},
  year={1988},
  volume={3},
  pages={297-308}
}
During a 10-year long term study, 6 eye-witnessed and 1 pressumed cases of abortions occurred in 3 one-male bisexual troops of free ranging langurs (Presbytis entellus) near Jodhpur, Rajasthan, India. The age of the unborns varied from 35 to about 200 days. The subsequent birth interval ranged between 7.1–21.1 months. 2 miscarriages occurred during stable periods of residency of a single male. 5 cases occurred prior to or after infanticide in connection with male changes. In one case a female… 

Infanticide and juvenilicide in Hanuman langurs (Presbytis entellus) around Jodhpur, India

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  • R. Palombit
  • Biology, Psychology
    Cold Spring Harbor perspectives in biology
  • 2015
Two bodies of evidence addressing coevolved strategies of males and females are reviewed, providing compelling evidence of sexually antagonistic coevolution surrounding the phenomenon of infanticide.

Catarrhine juvenile mortality in captivity, under seminatural conditions, and in the wild

  • I. Debyser
  • Biology
    International Journal of Primatology
  • 2007
Trauma, including infanticide and maternal inadequacy, seems to be a more important factor in infant mortality of Cercopithecoidea than infectious disease is, followed by trauma and maternal disorders, particularly related aberrant maternal behavior.

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