Abnormal neuronal distribution within the cerebral cortex after prenatal methylmercury intoxication

@article{Peckham2004AbnormalND,
  title={Abnormal neuronal distribution within the cerebral cortex after prenatal methylmercury intoxication},
  author={Norman H. Peckham and B. H. Choi},
  journal={Acta Neuropathologica},
  year={2004},
  volume={76},
  pages={222-226}
}
SummaryC57BL/6J mice were poisoned with methylmercury during pregnancy, and the location of heavily labeled neurons generated at embryonic day 16 was determined by tritiated thymidine autoradiography of the cerebral cortex of offspring at postnatal day 10. Camera lucida plotting of the distribution of radioactively labeled cortical neurons revealed statistically significant differences between control and methylmercury-treated groups. While control animals showed regular and tight packing of… 

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