Abdominal compartment syndrome

@article{Cheatham2009AbdominalCS,
  title={Abdominal compartment syndrome},
  author={Michael L. Cheatham},
  journal={Current Opinion in Critical Care},
  year={2009},
  volume={15},
  pages={154–162}
}
  • M. Cheatham
  • Published 1 April 2009
  • Medicine
  • Current Opinion in Critical Care
Purpose of reviewIntraabdominal hypertension (IAH) and abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS), the pathophysiologic implications of elevated intraabdominal pressure (IAP), have detrimental effects on all organ systems and are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Within the past few years, the diagnosis and management of these syndromes have evolved tremendously. Recent findingsConsensus definitions and recommendations for the diagnosis and management of IAH/ACS have been proposed… 
Fluid therapy and perfusional considerations during resuscitation in critically ill patients with intra-abdominal hypertension.
TLDR
The association between a positive fluid balance and outcomes among patients with IAH/ACS is reviewed and how optimisation of fluid administration and systemic/regional perfusion may potentially lead to improved outcomes among this patient population is reviewed.
Abdominal Decompression after Cardiac Surgery: Outcome of 42 Patients with Abdominal Compartment Syndrome
TLDR
Positive pressure wound therapy seems to promote and allow early fascia closure of the abdomen and represents therefore a likely benefit for the patient as well as independent risk factors for ACS.
A study of raised intra-abdominal pressure and the abdominal compartment syndrome in liver intensive care
TLDR
This thesis encompasses a survey of the available literature and national attitudes / practice with several clinical experiments regarding intra-abdominal pressure measurement and its link to complications / length of stay in patients in a specialised liver Intensive Therapy Unit (ITU).
INTRA-ABDOMINAL HYPERTENSION AND SECONDARY ABDOMINAL COMPARTMENT SYNDROME IN MEDICAL PATIENTS – COMPLICATION WITH A HIGH MORTALITY
TLDR
The study found a high incidence of intra-abdominal hypertension in this "non-traditional" for this type of patients’ complications, wherein 2.5% had a level III and IV and patients who developed IAH had a high SOFA score > 10, and high mortality 63%.
Loss of abdominal domain: Is it the abdominal wall or contents?
TLDR
Masurable increases in intra-abdominal cross-sectional area and decreases in abdominal wall length both contribute to the inability to safely close the abdomen in patients with intra-ABdominal hypertension, and support the use of multimodal techniques in the management of the open abdomen.
Automated Intra-abdominal Pressure Monitoring During Orthotopic Heart Transplant Leads to Early Diagnosis and Treatment of Intraoperative Abdominal Compartment Syndrome—A Case Report
We describe a case of spontaneous retroperitoneal hematoma leading to abdominal compartment syndrome and organ failure during a complicated orthotopic heart transplantation in a patient previously on
Minimally invasive percutaneous catheter drainage versus open laparotomy with temporary closure for treatment of abdominal compartment syndrome in patients with early-stage severe acute pancreatitis
TLDR
In conclusion, minimally invasive PCD is superior to open laparotomy with temporary closure, with fewer complications and deaths occurring in PCD group.
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References

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Abdominal Compartment Syndrome: Current Problems and New Strategies
TLDR
In patients with ACS emergency, it is recommended that decompressive laparotomy to be performed even if the intraabdominal pressure falls below 25 mmHg, and for patients with IAP levels higher than 25 mm hg, the IAP should be meticolusly brought below the cutoff level during the postoperative period.
Current insights in intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome: open the abdomen and keep it open!
TLDR
This review article is intended to provide surgeons with a clear insight into the current state of knowledge regarding IAH, ACS, and the impact of IAP on the critically ill patient.
The secondary and recurrent abdominal compartment syndrome.
TLDR
The aim of this paper is to review the historical background, awareness, definitions, pathophysiological implications and treatment options for SACS and RACS, which seem to be linked by the common occurrence of severe shock requiring aggressive fluid resuscitation.
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This review article will focus primarily on the recent literature on abdominal compartment syndrome (ACS) as well as the definitions and recommendations published by the World Society for the
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TLDR
Modern surgical techniques for opening the abdomen in patients with ACS refractory to medical therapy result in physiologic improvement with less treatment-related complications, but recuperation of organ dysfunction is variable.
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TLDR
Clinical awareness of ACS is steadily increasing, and it is time to pay attention to ACS, but further, to move forward with therapeutic bundles in a multi-centered, outcome trial on IAH/ACS therapy in order to elevate IAH and abdominal compartment syndrome management to an international standard of care.
Abdominal compartment syndrome in patients with severe acute pancreatitis in early stage.
TLDR
Patients with IAP at approximately 10-12 mmHg and early signs of changes in physiologic variables should be seriously considered for urgent decompression to improve survival, especially in patients admitted to the ICU because of AP.
The secondary abdominal compartment syndrome: not just another post-traumatic complication.
TLDR
Primary ACS is an extreme condition along a continuum of raised intra-abdominal pressure that is pathoneumonic when associated with new overt organ failure and when IAP is above normal but is not associated with organ failure, IAH is diagnosed.
Abdominal Compartment Syndrome Is Common in Medical Intensive Care Unit Patients Receiving Large-Volume Resuscitation
TLDR
Routine monitoring of intra-abdominal pressure should be considered in medical patients with a 5-L net positive fluid balance in 24 hours, but the clinical significance of this finding remains unclear.
Intraabdominal pressure monitoring during fluid resuscitation
  • M. Cheatham
  • Medicine
    Current opinion in critical care
  • 2008
TLDR
Intraabdominal pressure must be measured accurately and utilized in a goal-directed fashion to guide fluid and end-organ resuscitation and its ability to predict survival among the critically ill should be routinely monitored.
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