Abdominal Strengthening Exercises: A Comparative EMG Study

@article{Beim1997AbdominalSE,
  title={Abdominal Strengthening Exercises: A Comparative EMG Study},
  author={Gloria M. Beim and Giraldo Jl and Danny M. Pincivero and Matthew J. Borror and Freddie H. Fu},
  journal={Journal of Sport Rehabilitation},
  year={1997},
  volume={6},
  pages={11-20}
}
The purpose of this study was to compare electromyographic (EMG) activity of the abdominal muscles between the crunch exercise and five other popular abdominal exercises. Surface EMG recordings of four muscles (upper rectus, lower rectus, external oblique, and internal oblique) of the anterior abdominal wall were collected and analyzed on 20 healthy, male volunteers. EMG activity was recorded during execution of the abdominal crunch, the sit-up, and exercises performed with the Abflex machine… 
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