AURORAL CHEMISTRY: THE RIDDLE OF THE GREEN LINE

@inproceedings{Kragh2010AURORALCT,
  title={AURORAL CHEMISTRY: THE RIDDLE OF THE GREEN LINE},
  author={Helge S. Kragh},
  year={2010}
}
The aurora borealis, also known as the northern light, rarely appears in works on the history of chemistry. The phenomenon is located in the upper atmosphere and is caused by streams of electrical particles originating from the sun. Hence the history of the subject may seem to belong to either the history of meteorology or astronomy; or, as far as the mechanisms are concerned, to the history of physics. Indeed, these three subdisciplines of history of science have their important share of the… CONTINUE READING

Figures from this paper.

References

Publications referenced by this paper.
SHOWING 1-10 OF 33 REFERENCES

Spectrum of the Aurora,” Chem

J.A.R. Newlands
  • News, 1871, 23, 213; A. H. Church, “Spectrum of the Aurora,” Chem. News,
  • 1870
VIEW 3 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

Recherches sur le spectre solaire

VIEW 2 EXCERPTS
HIGHLY INFLUENTIAL

The Spectrum of the Aurora,

E. C. Pickering
  • Nature, 1870,
  • 2010
VIEW 1 EXCERPT

The Norwegian Aurora Polaris Expedition 1902-1903, Aschehoug, Oslo, 1913, Part 2, 662; L

K. Birkeland
  • Vegard, “Recent Results of Northlight Investigations,” Philos. Mag., 1921, 42, 47-87. The story of Wegener’s geocoronium has not received attention among historians of chemistry. J. A. Pérez-Bustamante, “Analytical Chemistry in the Discovery of the Elements,” J. Anal. Chem.,
  • 1997
VIEW 1 EXCERPT

J . Dewar , “ Presidential Address , ” Report , Brit

Gordin
  • , A Well - Ordered Thing : Dmitrii Mendeleev and the Shadow of the Periodic Table
  • 1989

A Chronological Edition

E. C. Moore, Ed, Writings of Charles S. Peirce
  • Chem. News, 1869,
  • 1984
VIEW 1 EXCERPT