ATM and related protein kinases: safeguarding genome integrity

@article{Shiloh2003ATMAR,
  title={ATM and related protein kinases: safeguarding genome integrity},
  author={Yosef Shiloh},
  journal={Nature Reviews Cancer},
  year={2003},
  volume={3},
  pages={155-168}
}
  • Y. Shiloh
  • Published 2003
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Nature Reviews Cancer
Maintenance of genome stability is essential for avoiding the passage to neoplasia. The DNA-damage response — a cornerstone of genome stability — occurs by a swift transduction of the DNA-damage signal to many cellular pathways. A prime example is the cellular response to DNA double-strand breaks, which activate the ATM protein kinase that, in turn, modulates numerous signalling pathways. ATM mutations lead to the cancer-predisposing genetic disorder ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T). Understanding… Expand
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