ASSORTATIVE MATING IN POISON-DART FROGS BASED ON AN ECOLOGICALLY IMPORTANT TRAIT

@inproceedings{Reynolds2007ASSORTATIVEMI,
  title={ASSORTATIVE MATING IN POISON-DART FROGS BASED ON AN ECOLOGICALLY IMPORTANT TRAIT},
  author={Robert Graham Reynolds and Benjamin M. Fitzpatrick},
  booktitle={Evolution; international journal of organic evolution},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract The origin of new species can be influenced by both deterministic and stochastic factors. Mate choice and natural selection may be important deterministic causes of speciation (as opposed to the essentially stochastic factors of geographic isolation and genetic drift). Theoretical models predict that speciation is more likely when mate choice depends on an ecologically important trait that is subject to divergent natural selection, although many authors have considered such mating… 

Disruptive ecological selection on a mating cue

The experiments showed that hybrid colour-pattern phenotypes are attacked more frequently than parental forms, and for the first time, disruptive ecological selection on a trait that also acts as a mating cue is demonstrated.

Divergent warning patterns contribute to assortative mating between incipient Heliconius species

It is revealed that divergent color patterns contribute to mate recognition between the incipient species Heliconius himera and H. erato, a taxon pair for which assortative mating by color pattern has been demonstrated among wild individuals, and it is demonstrated that males are more likely to attempt to mate conspecific females.

Color Assortative Mating in a Mainland Population of the Poison Frog Oophaga pumilio

It is indicated that coloration is an important trait in driving the natural mate choices of female O. pumilio, which provides valuable insight into realistic mate selection tactics of this dendrobatid frog.

Polymorphic Butterfly Reveals the Missing Link in Ecological Speciation

Study of a butterfly population with a mimetic wing color polymorphism found that the butterflies exhibited partial, color-based, assortative mate preference, which represent the divergent, ecologically based signal and preference components of sexual isolation that usually distinguish incipient and sibling species.

Cryptic female Strawberry poison frogs experience elevated predation risk when associating with an aposematic partner

It is found that the estimated survival time of a cryptic frog was reduced when associating with an aposematic partner, suggesting that predation may act as a direct selective force on female choice, favoring evolution of color assortative mating that, in turn, may strengthen the divergence in coloration that natural selection has generated.

INTRASPECIFIC REPRODUCTIVE CHARACTER DISPLACEMENT IN A POLYMORPHIC POISON DART FROG, DENDROBATES PUMILIO

This study tested the hypothesis that female strawberry poison dart frogs (Dendrobates pumilio) in polymorphic populations of the Bocas del Toro archipelago of Panama show stronger mating discrimination than do females from monomorphic populations, exhibiting an intraspecific pattern of reproductive character displacement.

Poison frog color morphs express assortative mate preferences in allopatry but not sympatry

The strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) displays extreme color polymorphism in and around the young Bocas del Toro archipelago, and in a transition zone between red and blue allopatric lineages, female preferences diverged along with coloration, and whether any divergent preferences persist in a zone of sympatry is highlighted.

The role of predator selection on polymorphic aposematic poison frogs

A purifying role for predator selection is demonstrated, as brightly coloured novel forms are more likely to suffer an attack than both local aposematic and cryptic forms, and colour patterns of poison frogs may truly represent a ‘magic trait’.

RAPID POPULATION DIVERGENCE LINKED WITH CO‐VARIATION BETWEEN COLORATION AND SEXUAL DISPLAY IN STRAWBERRY POISON FROGS

It is argued that changes in aposematic coloration may rapidly cause not only postmating isolation due to poorly adapted hybrids, but also premating isolation through shifts in mating behaviors.

Hybridization promotes color polymorphism in the aposematic harlequin poison frog, Oophaga histrionica

The findings suggest that hybridization can produce phenotypic novelty even in systems where phenotypes are subject to strong stabilizing selection, and are compatible with a hybrid origin for the new morph.
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 56 REFERENCES

Reproductive isolation caused by colour pattern mimicry

It is shown that a shift in colour pattern mimicry was crucial in the origin of two butterfly species, and individuals from a population of H. melpomene allopatric to H. cydno court and mate with the sister species more readily than those from a sympatric population, suggesting that assortative mating has been enhanced in sympatry.

Specialized Feeding Behavior Influences Both Ecological Specialization and Assortative Mating in Sympatric Host Races of Pea Aphids

The results suggest that the major proximal determinant of host specialization is the behavioral acceptance of a plant rather than the toxicity of the food source, and key characters responsible for host plant specialization are identified.

What initiates speciation in passion-vine butterflies?

Mate choice and hybrid viability experiments in a pair of warningly colored butterflies that maintain their genetic integrity in the face of hybridization are reported, adding to a growing body of evidence that challenge the importance of genomic incompatibilities in the earliest stages of speciation.

Phenotypic and genetic divergence in three species of dart-poison frogs with contrasting parental behavior.

It is demonstrated that the color and pattern variation among populations of D. pumilio is not matched by higher levels of mitochondrial DNA sequence divergence relative to P. lugubris or Minyobates sp.

MULTILOCUS MODELS OF SYMPATRIC SPECIATION: BUSH VERSUS RICE VERSUS FELSENSTEIN

  • J. D. Fry
  • Biology
    Evolution; international journal of organic evolution
  • 2003
Documenting instances of sympatric species that are reproductively isolated only by host or habitat preference would provide evidence for the plausibility of symp atric speciation in nature.

Models of speciation by sexual selection on polygenic traits.

  • R. Lande
  • Biology
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1981
The models elucidate genetic mechanisms that can initiate or contribute to rapid speciation by sexual isolation and divergence of secondary sexual characters in polygamous species.

Strong assortative mating between allopatric sticklebacks as a by-product of adaptation to different environments

The results indicate that the by-product mechanism is a potent source of reproductive isolation, and likely contributed to the origin of sympatric species of sticklebacks.

Sexual Signaling and Speciation, a Microevolutionary Perspective

This paper presents an approach that involves two analyses: studies of which signals are sexually selected within a species, and parallel studies of the signals that are involved in behavioral isolation between closely related species to provide support for the hypothesis that sexual selection can drive speciation.

Speciation by hybridization in Heliconius butterflies

It is shown that a hybrid trait in an animal species can directly cause reproductive isolation, and that the phenotype of H. heurippa reproductively isolates it from both parental species.

Sympatric speciation in phytophagous insects: moving beyond controversy?

The evidence for sympatric speciation via host shifting for phytophagous insects is reviewed and a set of testable predictions for distinguishing geographic mode (allopatric versus sympatrics) of divergence are proposed.
...