ASSESSING MESSNER AND ROSENFELD'S INSTITUTIONAL ANOMIE THEORY: A PARTIAL TEST*

@article{Chamlin1995ASSESSINGMA,
  title={ASSESSING MESSNER AND ROSENFELD'S INSTITUTIONAL ANOMIE THEORY: A PARTIAL TEST*},
  author={Mitchell B. Chamlin and John K. Cochran},
  journal={Criminology},
  year={1995},
  volume={33},
  pages={411-429}
}
In Crime and the American Dream, Messner and Rosenfeld contend that culturally and structurally produced pressures to secure monetary rewards, coupled with weak controls from noneconomic social institutions, promote high levels of instrumental crime. Empirically, they suggest that the effects of economic conditions on profit-related crime depend on the strength of noneconomic institutions. This investigation evaluates this proposition with cross-sectional data for U.S. states. In brief; the… 
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Messner and Rosenfeld's institutional anomie theory is grounded in the assumption that relatively higher crime rates in the United States are due to (1) the overwhelming influence of economic motives
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This research assesses the empirical validity of the classic anomie theory articulated by Robert Merton and the important contemporary extension of his work encompassed in Messner and Rosenfeld's
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Messner and Rosenfeld have proposed an institutional anomie theory of crime, incorporating the proposition that societal investments in programs to buffer citizens from capricious market forces
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Institutional anomie theory (IAT) explains variations in crime at the societal level by the combination of cultural features and the balance of power between economic and noneconomic institutions.
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Extant assessments of Messner and Rosenfeld’s institutional-anomie theory (1994) have generally supported the thesis that, in social collectives where the economy dominates, non-economic institutions
Culture, Institutions, and Morally Dubious Behaviors: Testing Some Core Propositions of the Institutional-Anomie Theory
This study draws on self-report data on the prevalence of morally dubious behaviors in Europe to examine Messner and Rosenfeld's institutional-anomie theory. Institutional-anomie theory tries to
Economic Dominance, the “American Dream,” and Homicide: A Cross‐National Test of Institutional Anomie Theory
This article presents a cross-national test of Messner and Rosenfeld's (1994) institutional anomie theory. Drawing on multiple data sources, including the United Nations, World Bank, World Values
A Cross-National Test of Institutional Anomie Theory: Do the Strength of Other Social Institutions Mediate or Moderate the Effects of the Economy on the Rate of Crime? 1
This study presents a test of Messner and Rosenfeld's theory of institutional anomie. It employs cross- national data on the rates of homicide and theft, as well as a variety of indicators of the
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